Get Stronger With PRO

Love it or hate it, you know it’s coming …

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Instead of slogging through chilly, wet, slippery miles by yourself this winter, come join Performance Running Outfitters for its new Strength + Run Class. The class will focus on improving strength and building a great base so you’re ready to roll when spring arrives.

Here are the details:

Brookfield Location (2205 N Calhoun Road): Wednesday nights at 6pm starting on December 7

Shorewood Location (4533 N Oakland Avenue): Tuesday nights at 6pm starting on December 6

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6:00-6:25pm: Body weight strength training focused on runners (core, hips, legs, and arms)

6:25-6:30pm: Get your winter gear on

6:30pm: GO OUT & RUN!  Choose your route: 2 Miles or 4 Miles

 

Cost: $80/Person

What you get when you sign up:

  • Weekly workout focusing on strength + endurance
  • Group accountability and focus
  • Smartwool Socks
  • Winter Beanie

 

To learn more or to register, contact Nicole at Nicole@performancerunning.com

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

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Fuel Up! Nutrition Tips For Your Next Run

Ever find yourself running on fumes at the end of long run? Or maybe you’ve felt sluggish during miles that you normally have a bit more spring in your step.

Although there are several reasons a run can turn into a ride on the struggle bus, one culprit may be nutrition. Below, Nicole Kerneen RD,CD,CSSD, with Froedtert’s Runners’ Clinic, helps us understand the role nutrition plays in training and how you can fuel better your next run.

How can eating right help improve a person’s running?

For any sport, eating right helps with performance and recovery, and sometimes performance even lies within the recovery. Athletes in general don’t realize how important good rest and proper recovery nutrition are for their overall gains and performance. Nutrition is everything. It helps to decrease inflammation that’s built up from running, which in turn helps decrease muscle breakdown. It helps to decrease stress hormone, which is elevated while running, and therefore helps a person recover in a more timely manner, especially with two-a-day workouts and quick turnovers between runs.

What are some common mistakes you see runners making when it comes to nutrition? How might these mistakes be corrected?

Improper recovery and hydration. I tell all my athletes, recovery starts at breakfast. Recovery starts immediately. Going into your run strong helps you come out of it even stronger with less tissue damage and therefore less damage control. Meal timing and proper planning is crucial.

What are some common myths about running and nutrition? What’s the truth behind the myths?

A common myth is if I’m smaller, I run faster. This is not true. Your speed, stamina, endurance and agility are all determined by training your body physically and eating to support that training.

Another myth is that carbs are bad, fat is better. This is also not true. Your body responds to how you train it. If you force it to rely on fat for energy, then eventually it will respond well by this, but switching over takes time and many people don’t feel well during the process. Depending on the type of activity, level and training, this form of eating can create a lot of stress on the body. There is a time and a place for all types of intake. It’s important to work with someone trained in all areas of nutrition to help you understand what would be best for your particular body and body type.

What does a good diet look like for runners in training? What types of foods should runners include in their diets? Are there any foods that should be limited or avoided?

A good diet is going to vary from one person to the next depending on their likes, dislikes, lifestyle, running demands and other training schedules. For the most part, a focus on good quality carbohydrates spread throughout the day, in addition to lean proteins, some healthy fats and a focus on anti-inflammatory choices from any of those categories.

I recommend eating fish whenever possible, as well as lean meats such as pork and poultry. Eggs are powerful to include in any diet as they are loaded with such great choline and some vitamin D and clean burn proteins. And let’s not forget about greens!!! My clients get sick of me talking about greens, but they are everyone’s best friend. They are loaded with antioxidants, vitamin K, calcium, iron, magnesium – all of which are phenomenal for muscle and tissue health in addition to good skin and healthy bones. Greens help neutralize the acids in our diet, which help to maintain good bone health. On top of the foods mentioned above, berries, apples, bananas and mangos are loaded with antioxidants, incredible doses of potassium and are rich in slow-burn carbohydrates, which is the preferred energy source of the body.

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There’s so much hype around limiting carbohydrates, but study after study, still shows how efficient carbs are for a runner. They create the less stress for the body to convert to energy and on top of that, they carry all those stress fighting B vitamins that help the body manage the stress of working out, enhancing recovery and keeping brain chemistry balanced as well. They also aid in identifying true hunger cues.

Anti-inflammatory fats such as avocados, nuts and nut butter (just make sure they are dry roasted and not laden with inflammatory oils), olive oil, small amounts of coconut oil, grapeseed oil, avocado oil, etc. are also crucial for good joint and heart health. The key to these is having them a couple hours before and after a workout. Fats can inhibit proper recovery as they slow down the re-uptake of carbs and protein into the muscle.

Let’s talk about pre- and post-workout nutrition. When is it appropriate to eat a pre-workout snack and what are some good options? When is it appropriate to eat a post-workout snack and what are some good options?

Eating a pre-workout snack depends on the intensity and length of your workout in addition to your last meal. If it’s been three hours since you’ve eaten and dinner is still another three hours away, then it’s absolutely necessary for you to have a pre-workout snack, anywhere between 30-60min before you start the workout. It’s important to have the right kind of carbs –typically something that has a combination of carbs so you have a faster release blended with a moderate and slow release. This helps you have a steady and powerful energy throughout the workout. It’s also good to have a small amount of protein going into a workout to release some amino acid in the blood stream and aid in less tissue breakdown.

Depending on likes and dislikes, workouts, etc., a few snack recommendations include:

  • A Clif bar – It offers a 3:1 carb to protein ratio with a nice blend of the different types of carbs.
  • A regular, fruited yogurt – This snack is most excellent for magnesium and potassium and offers at least a 2:1 carb to protein ratio. However, most are a solid 3:1 ratio.
  • A peanut butter sandwich with a piece of fruit
  • A “GORP” type snack mix with dried fruit/pretzels or Goldfish crackers and your favorite Chex-like cereal. This mix provides you with different carbs, sodium and potassium….all easy-burn carbs so they don’t upset your stomach.

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Protein isn’t always necessary before a workout, but depending on timing and amounts – I’m talking about 10 grams – it can be a nice enhancement. This is why you see people taking in amino acids of BCAA’s before a workout. However, this isn’t necessary – a piece of string cheese or an ounce of chicken, tuna or turkey with a piece of bread or crackers and fruit is great!

Post-workout snacks are also critical. When I work with someone, I use their amount of lean mass to help determine their carb needs post workout. It’s the muscle we are fueling and refueling, so knowing one’s muscle mass is really important. A post-workout snack can consist of anywhere between 45 and 110grams of carbs – it all depends on the muscle mass for the individual. Without knowing specific numbers, I always suggest at least 45grams.

Similar to a pre-workout snack, an immediate post-workout snack also needs a 3-4:1 ratio of carbs to protein. This is why chocolate milk has been touted as one of the best and most effective post-workout drinks. It has fast and slower burning carbs to keep the recovery going until the next meal (preferably no longer than two hours post workout) and it has just enough protein. Post workout protein needs vary between 12-20 grams. Studies have shown that anything more than 20 grams is overkill.

A few post-workout snack examples include:

  • 12-16oz of chocolate milk
  • Regular yogurt + fruit or cereal
  • Clif bar

Smoothies or shakes are also great after a run because they also help with rehydration. Here’s a basic recipe to make a post-run smoothie:

Banana

1 scoop of protein powder – 10ish grams worth OR 1 cup of regular yogurt or ½ cup of Greek yogurt

1 cup of fruit

1 Tbsp of honey

¼ – ½ cup of oatmeal

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What types of Performance Nutrition services are offered through the Runners’ Clinic?

  • Performance Nutrition Assessment – During this assessment, the athlete tells me about their current situation and I ask a few more questions so I can provide immediate feedback. No plan is created and a body comp read is optional unless I find it necessary based on our conversation.
  • Performance Nutrition Consult – This consult and the assessment can go hand in hand. At a full consult, we identify goals and trouble areas. I do a complete intake of one’s diet/training and lifestyle. In addition, we always take a body fat read so I can better create a program based on their present and desired state. A plan is also developed during the session and the client goes home with information based on their body.
  • Grocery Store Performance – I meet the athlete at their favorite grocery store and we walk the aisles. I educate and also help them put together meals and snacks based on their needs.
  • Pantry Performance – This is where I come to the athlete’s home or they take a picture of what they currently have in their pantry. I give them ideas and recipes to help them obtain a pantry built for performance.
  • Performance Nutrition Overhaul – This includes several sessions – all of the sessions listed above with some additional follow-up. This is a real hands-on program, offering tailored plans and lots of education!

How can all runners – experienced and beginners, competitive and non-competitive – benefit from Performance Nutrition services?

Everyone can benefit from working with a Board-Certified Sports Dietitian. We are trained in all areas of physiology and dietetics in addition to the emphasis on sports and exercise. Some, like myself, are also trained in eating disorders and disordered eating and have a wealth of experience working with different behaviors and changes through the life cycle a.k.a hormonal and endocrine changes. Anyone who wants to make sure that they are giving themselves the nutrition they need can benefit from getting a review of their current intake. A lot can be learned with just one session! The body is an intricate piece of work. Not everyone is the same so it’s important that health past and present be used to determine what the individual needs today!

Thanks so much for chatting with us, Nicole! To learn more about the Runners’ Clinic and Performance Nutrition services, visit http://www.froedtert.com/sports-medicine/performance-enhancement/nutrition

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Developing A Race Kick

When watching the track events during the Rio Olympic Games, you likely noticed many of the races came down to who could finish the fastest during the latter stage of the race. During some races, the drive to the finish began after the halfway point but in others the real racing didn’t begin until the bell lap. And from there, whoever could close the fastest emerged as the medal winners.

This type of race is all about developing a wicked kick and being able to quickly shift into another gear at the right time while battling end-of-race fatigue. Even for everyday runners, it’s a good tactic to learn – whether you’re racing the clock or a fellow runner, a blazing fast finish is a great way to achieve your goal.

Below, Coach Matt Thull from ThunderDome Running provides tips to help you kick in your next race.

Can you start off by explaining what a race kick is and what purpose it serves?

In a way it is hard to define since a race kick might start after the first 1/3 of the race (a longer extended/faster surge) or it might not start until the last 1/3 or even the last 1-2 minutes of a race. It’s usually a negative split attempt or a final push in to the finish. I consider the race kick an individual effort – one that allows you to sleep soundly at night knowing you left it all out there on race day.

What are the different types of kick a runner might use?

It’s interesting how many different ways runners can use a push-to-the-line kick. If you look at any distance racing record from the mile up to the marathon, they were set with a negative split and that leads right into using every different kind of kick available. It can start midway through the race after a relaxed start or a final quarter-mile kick or final minute kick after pushing the redline throughout the race.

What are the benefits of having a strong race kick?

A strong kick is what can help you achieve a negative split, a PR or a good old-fashioned race to the finish with someone in your age group. If you are actually thinking about a race kick, that means you probably did not run too fast in the early stages of the race. It’s also a lot more fun since you have momentum on your side, and you are getting to think about a race kick/running faster when you are most tired.

What are some running workouts a runner can do to develop a better race kick?

There are a lot of great options runners can use to help their race kick. Those pieces of training might be strength/gym/plyometric-based or might include actual running workouts. For running workouts, hills are great for developing a kick. Surges and speed ups within your runs help as well as ending all your hard workouts with some type of “FINAL” interval. A runner might choose to do a faster finish ¼ mile or ½ mile after their real workout. In a way that final interval is a bonus for the day—just like a kick is in a race.

Tell us more about strength training and plyometric workouts – how might these workouts help improve a runner’s kick?

Way too many runners “just run” and do not focus enough on the lower leg strength work that plyometrics, squats or even yoga bring out. The push comes from your core, hips and glutes in running. When you are more tired but wanting to kick—wouldn’t it be nice to rely on a strong lower half? So it’s totally worth it to do the gym work. Your turnover/cadence gets pretty slow and loafing if you don’t have strong glutes and lower legs.

How much of a strong race kick is mental? How can runners work at gathering themselves for that final push during a race?

With coaching high school runners I see this a lot, the big time SHOW of a final last 30-second mad dash into the finish line when the crowd is around happens all the time. Honestly, in a way that shows perhaps the runners did not push themselves hard enough in the middle of the race.

But maybe you went hard from the middle to the last part of the race used your race kick earlier than others – and that is also okay. That runner might not have as fast of kick but used the strong/long push to the finish line earlier in the race.

Often the big kick is a bonus because you have used up so much getting yourself to that last ¼ mile or last 30 seconds of the race. That race kick for anyone is the perfect mixture of mental and physical toughness since you have already raced hard but are now asking your legs/body to run harder—that is the ultimate kick & produces the most satisfaction. If you can think of the finish kick as very small parts of 30 seconds or 60 seconds you can ALWAYS push or sprint. So I recommend looking at your watch for those small running windows instead of thinking about how far it is to the finish line.

Do you have any other comments or tips?

It really helps to race under/shorter your focus race distance to work on your kick/speed. If you are a 10k runner, race some 5ks or mile races to work on your race kick/speed. If you are a half marathon or marathon runner, get out of your comfort zone/pace a bit and race some shorter distance races so half marathon/marathon pace feels easier. That way you will have a better chance to find that long extended kick in your distance races.

Thanks so much for chatting with us, Coach Thull! To learn more about ThunderDome Running and coaching services, visit ThunderDomeRunning.com.

We hope you all have a wonderful holiday weekend!

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Running With Pups 101

When properly trained, your pup can be one of the very best training partners you can find. But it’s not as simple as leading Fido out the door and hoping he’ll follow along. Just like their human companions, dogs require conditioning and build up before they can handle a running program.

Dr. Jamie Fleming, an internal medicine specialist with Lakeshore Veterinary Specialists and Performance Running Outfitters team member, provides tips for running safely with your pup so you both enjoy the miles.

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With the warmer temps, more runners are bringing their pups with them for a run. What are some things people should keep in mind before leashing up?

Remember… your dog is much like you in terms of conditioning, both for distance and for heat/humidity. Just like you wouldn’t set out to run 3 miles with no build up, your companion needs to be conditioned to run any substantial distance (really anything over a mile or so). Imagine a canine version of “Couch to 5K”. If it’s humid or above 75 degrees, make sure to have water available for your pooch, as the risk of heat exposure/heat exhaustion is a serious threat at warmer temperatures – or even cooler temperatures with high humidity.

Can all dogs go for a run? Or are there certain types/breeds that should stick with walking?

Obviously, the more sporting breeds (labs, retrievers, pointers, etc.) are better suited to running compared to some of our smaller breed friends. In general, before introducing a running plan, if your companion has never run with you before, it’s always a great idea to check with your veterinarian to ensure that there are no health concerns that might make walking a safer/healthier option. In general, breeds with a short snout (called brachycephalic breeds, like the bulldog) should exercise with caution due to their limited ability to cool effectively.

What distances are safe for dogs to run? What about paces?

Just like you, with proper conditioning, there are no absolute rules/restrictions when it comes to distance or pace. Often, our dogs are comfortable at paces much quicker than their human companions. A good rule of thumb is gradually building into any sort of distance (again, anything over ½ to 1 mile should require some build-up) to make sure your pet is able to run comfortably next to you as you increase the distance over time. If you notice your 4-legged friend is lagging behind, or taking longer to recover, this might be a sign that he/she is being pushed too hard. Again, consulting your veterinarian if you have specific questions or concerns about your dog and longer distances is always a good idea.

Are there any weather conditions that might be dangerous for pups to go for a run?

I would be cautious about running any sort of distance in humid climates and as the temperature rises over the summer months. With the warmer and more humid weather, making sure you are choosing cooler times of day, such as early morning and late evening, will help to minimize the risk of heat stroke. Dogs are significantly affected by the heat and humidity, as they do not sweat/perspire through their skin, like we do. Instead, they exchange heat/cool themselves by panting, which means they cool their entire body through a very small surface. Imagine how difficult it would be for us to cool off, if we didn’t sweat and use our skin for heat exchange!

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Are there any rules for pup hydration? What about diet – should people avoid feeding their dog right before going for a run?

In terms of hydration, a good rule of thumb is that if you are warm/thirsty, your dog probably is too. Whether hanging out in the heat or going for a run, anticipate your dog’s water needs by carrying a portable water bottle/drinking bowl. If your dog likes to swim, running near a clean/safe water source is always a great way to ensure they stay cool and hydrated, too. Figuring out your dog’s hydration needs is a part of the build-up and conditioning – some dogs will finish a run and dive into the water bowl and others are more gradual. You do not need to use Gatorade or other electrolyte supplements; however, if going on a lengthy hike, your dog might appreciate a dog friendly snack, just like us humans do! It is always easier to stay ahead of hydration needs than to deal with the serious consequences that our dogs can suffer when they become dehydrated and overheated.

In general, I recommend against feeding prior to a run, although research has not linked this to any significant issues. Some veterinarians do feel that running on a full stomach can increase the risk of bloat (gastric dilatation volvulus). A small snack is probably sufficient for a light to moderate run.

Why are leashes important – even if your dog is friendly?

As part of a veterinary team that deals with the daily consequences of “good dogs” being hit by cars or getting into fights with other dogs, leashing your dog is a MUST. Even if your dog is the model by which all dogs should be judged, if another dog misbehaves, the leash is also a way to pull your dog into safety and away from the aggressor.

What about dogs that haven’t gone on a run before – do you have any tips to help people get started with running with a dog?

First, start with walking. Make sure your dog is comfortable heeling next to you and not pulling you over, tripping you, or dodging in all directions. Once you and your dog are comfortable at a walk, you can try jogging – again, keep in mind conditioning and start with distances around ½ to 1 mile. Also, consider rewarding your dog’s good behavior.

Any other tips to help people run safely with their dog?

Remember, that if your dog runs too far without proper conditioning, or the ground is really hot, they can damage their footpads, resulting in significant pain and discomfort (burns, tears, etc.). Again, by heading out in the cooler times of the day and following proper conditioning, this should help to minimize the risk. If you do use booties, proper fit is vital (just like our running shoes!) and make sure to evaluate for any rubbing or damage after your run.

Booties might be indicated to help protect against abrasions on rough or hot pavement, on rocky hiking trips, and during the winter in the extreme cold and ice.

Any other comments?

With the humidity and heat – when in doubt, keep the runs short, take your dog out early or later in the cooler temperatures, and remember that you have to look out for your dog, as they will run from the heart to keep up with their human companion (and not look out for their own needs).

Thanks so much for chatting with us, Dr. Fleming! If you’re interested in learning more about running with your dog or have other general pet questions, Lakeshore Veterinary Specialists is a wonderful resource with locations in Oak Creek, Glendale and Port Washington. You can learn more here: http://www.lakeshorevetspecialists.com/

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Check It Out: Milwaukee Running Expo

Looking for something to do this weekend? If you’re free on Saturday, check out the Milwaukee Running Expo at Fleet Feet Sports Brookfield!

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At the expo, you can check out the latest running shoes and accessories, sign up for local races and learn more about running-related products and services. All major shoes brands will be in attendance, along with many local race directors, business owners and running experts.

Every hour on the hour from 8am-3pm, there will be a 2-mile group run, during which you can test out any demo shoe. This is a great opportunity to try out a pair of shoes before you buy! If you can’t make one of the group runs, you can still try on any shoes you want and take them on a test run.

There will also be group workouts lead by Tori Hartmann of FitHart at 9:30am and 10:30am.

Expo vendors include:

Shoes: Asics, New Balance, Hoka, Brooks, Saucony, Adidas, Mizuno

Socks: Feetures, Balega

Compression: CEP

Injury Prevention: Trigger Point

Race Directors: Chris Ponteri (Milwaukee Running Festival), Lighthouse Events

Running Coach: Matt Thull of ThunderDome Running

Nutrition: CLIF, GU

Local Health Experts: Kyle Weber, PT of Weber Physical Therapy

If you’re interested in attending, register here: http://www.fleetfeetbrookfield.com/in-store-events/milwaukee-running-expo-2016

Have a fabulous weekend, everyone!

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Join in the Fun at Milwaukee Running Day!

Join your fellow running enthusiasts and come celebrate our city’s newest holiday: Milwaukee Running Day! Hosted by the Milwaukee Running Festival, this is a must-attend event for all runners in the MKE area.

Today we have Chris Ponteri, Executive Director of Milwaukee Marathon Inc., here to tell us all about the upcoming celebration. But before we get started, here are the specifics you’ll need to mark on your calendar:

What: Milwaukee Running Day

When: Thursday, June 2 @6:30pm

Where: Veteran’s Park

What is Milwaukee Running Day?

It’s a day to celebrate running and Milwaukee. We are planning a celebration event at Veteran’s Park that evening which will include a 4.14-mile fun run and a party with vendors and refreshments. We will also read a proclamation from Mayor Barrett declaring it Milwaukee Running Day, and who knows, maybe he will attend and read it in person.

Why did you decide to create a Milwaukee Running Day and how did you pick June 2 to celebrate the holiday?

National Running Day is June 1, and we thought the day might be best. That way, it could be a two-day celebration of the activity we all love so much.

Why should MKE runners join the event?

It will be a great way to meet like-minded people in a beautiful lakefront setting, get in some miles and talk running.

Can you tell us a bit about the course? What is the distance and where does the course travel?

The course is 4.14 miles (Milwaukee is the 414 area code, so why not?!?!?). It will start/finish near the lagoon in Veterans Park and stay on the Oak Leaf Trail. It is not a timed run and will be only for fun.

What’s happening after the run/walk portion of the event?

We plan to have plenty of food and beverages for purchase, will be playing music and should have most of the local running stores in attendance. We will have more details on this as the date gets closer. We are going to try to create a fun, running-themed atmosphere.

Who can participate and do people need to register? If so, is there a registration fee?

There is no need to register and it’s free. Just show up and enjoy. We have created a Facebook page and the link is here https://www.facebook.com/events/180282155694040/. This will have all of the details and current information.

Are walkers welcome? What about strollers and/or pets?

Walkers, strollers, pets are all welcome!

Who are the event sponsors?

This event was made possible by a generous donation from Running in the USA. Since it’s a free event and does not generate any revenue, it was important that we raise enough funds to cover the insurance and permit fees, and Running in the USA’s contribution did just that. We can’t thank Bill and Mary Flaws enough for making this happen.

Thanks so much for chatting with us, Chris!

Will we see you at the upcoming Milwaukee Running Day celebration?

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Try It: AlterG Treadmill Training

If you follow the training of professional runners, you may notice that many of them utilize an AlterG® at some point or another to either add volume without additional stress on the body or to maintain fitness while recovering from an injury.

Even though the great majority of us are not training to compete at the highest level, we can still take advantage of this technology. Locally, you can run on an AlterG® at Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Sports Medicine Runners’ Clinic.

Below, Sara Ziegele, DPT with Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Sports Medicine Runners’ Clinic tells us more about how runners can benefit from this training tool.

Can you start off by telling us a bit about how an AlterG® treadmill works?

The AlterG® is a specialized treadmill that allows an individual to run or walk at partial body weight. For example, an individual weighing 150 pounds can set the treadmill to 50 percent and have only 75 pounds impact the treadmill. The runner wears a specifically designed pair of shorts that zip into a waist-height “tent” around the treadmill. The “tent” inflates with air to place an upward force on the lower body and reduce the weight.

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What are the benefits of using an AlterG® treadmill?

Runners can maintain cardiovascular conditioning while minimizing stress on the lower body, reduce compensations and habits that develop from running with pain and return to running sooner than on the ground.

Can you tell us more about the degree of lift? How is the degree of lift determined for each participant?

The AlterG® can be set between 20 percent and 100 percent of body weight. That translates to more than 80 percent of your weight being held up by the air. The degree of lift will be individually determined by the Runners’ Clinic staff. Usually, runners recovering from impact injuries are set between 50-75 percent. Uninjured runners are set between 75- 95 percent.

Can you tell us more about how an AlterG® treadmill benefits each of the following groups?

  • Injured or recovering runners: Allows the runner to return to training sooner while unloading the injured region
  • Runners looking for a performance boost: Allows the runner to maximize cardiovascular training while reducing lower extremity stress
  • Runners just getting into running/exercise: Allows the runner to gradually increase the training load

How do you recommend runners incorporate AlterG® treadmill running into their training?

Training strategies on the AlterG® are very similar to any other surface. A runner should build up gradually to avoid overtraining. The higher percentage of body weight, the more natural the mechanics.

What’s the procedure for using the AlterG® treadmill at the Runners’ Clinic? Can people use the treadmill even if they are not a current Runners’ Clinic patient?

The AlterG® is available at the Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Sports Medicine Runners’ Clinic for patients and uninjured runners. Runners currently completing physical therapy (PT) can incorporate the treadmill into their rehabilitation program. To use the AlterG outside of PT, fees range from $15 (single, 30-minute sessions) to $175 (12-60 minute sessions across the course of a month), with additional options available.

Thanks for chatting with us, Dr. Ziegele! To learn more about Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Sports Medicine Runners’ Clinic, visit their website or call 414.805.7114.

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!