Race It: 2016 Turkey Trot Round Up

For many runners, racing a local turkey trot is as much a Thanksgiving tradition as eating pumpkin pie. In fact, according to Running USA, it’s the most popular holiday to run a race.

So before you start chowing down on turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce and, of course, pumpkin pie, lace up your running shoes and gobble up a few miles at one of these local turkey trots!

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Drumstick Dash

When: Thursday, Nov. 24, 8:30 a.m.

Where: Miller Park, Milwaukee

Cost: $35 for adults; $20 for kids ages 5-12

Details: This 5k race is both runner and walker friendly, and participants can register as an individual or as part of a team. The event is chip timed and awards are given to the top three male and female overall winners. If you are unable to make the race but would still like to participate, there is an Outta Town Dash Around option. The event benefits Feeding America Eastern Wisconsin and a food drive will take place before the start of the race.

Website: https://raceroster.com/events/2016/8133/2016-drumstick-dash

Thrivent Turkey Trot

When: Thursday, Nov. 24, 8:30 a.m.

Where: Wehmhoff Jucker Park, Burlington

Cost: $30 for individuals

Details: Both runners and walkers are welcome at this 5k race, and participants can register as an individual or as part of a team. All participants will receive a t-shirt and goodie bag. Awards will be given to the top 3 overall male and female finishers as well as the top 3 finishers in each age group. The race benefits Love, Inc. and a food drive will be held before the race. Raffle tickets will be awarded for items donated with raffle prizes including turkeys.

Website: http://www.runthanksgiving.com

Milwaukee Turkey Trot

When: Thursday, Nov. 24, 9 a.m.

Where: Veteran’s Park, Milwaukee

Cost: $36.99 for the 5k; $39.99 for the 8k through Nov. 21; After Nov. 21, $50 for the 5k and $60 for the 8k

Details: Both 5k and 8k races are available at this event. All participants receive chip timing, a quarter zip fleece top and cinnamon rolls at the finish line. Awards will be given to the top three overall males and females as well as the top three males and females in each age group. The race benefits Hunger Task Force.

Website: http://www.milwaukeeturkeytrot.com/

Milwaukee’s Great Gobble Wobble

When: Thursday, Nov. 24, 9 a.m.

Where: Boerner Botanical Gardens, Hales Corners

Cost: $35 for individuals

Details: Both runners and walkers are welcome to participate in this 5k event that winds through Whitnall Park and Boerner Botanical Gardens. Participants can opt to run as an individual or as part of a team, or sign up for the virtual race option. All participants get a race shirt and finisher’s medal.

Website: http://www.silvercirclesportsevents.com/milwaukees-great-gobble-wobble-5k-run-walk

Mayor’s Turkey Day Run

When: Thursday, Nov. 24, 9 a.m.

Where: Kenosha Public Museum, Kenosha

Cost: $15 for adults; $10 for kids ages 14 and under

Details: Both 10k and 2-mile races are available at this event. The Mayor’s Cup Trophy will be awarded to the overall male and female winners in 10k race. Trophies will be given to overall male and female in 2-mile walk/run. Age group winners will receive a medal.

Website: http://www.kenosharunningclub.org/Turkey%20Day/turkey.html

5k Turkey Trot & Gobble Gallop

When: Thursday, Nov. 24, 9 a.m.

Where: Thiensville Village Park, Thiensville

Cost: $30 for individuals

Details: This year’s race benefits a variety of community events and projects, including Lasata’s Cycling Without Age, new playground equipment for the Thiensville Village Park, Portal, Inc., Interfaith Caregivers of Ozaukee County and COPE Services. In addition to the 5k run/walk, there will also be a 50-meter dash for kids ages 12 and under.

Website: http://www.juniorsmt.org/turkey-trot.html

St. Leonard’s Turkey Trot

When: Thursday, Nov. 24, 9 a.m.

Where: St. Leonard Parish, Muskego

Cost: $25; $65 per team

Details: All 5k participants receive a t-shirt and goodie bag. Awards will be given to the 1st through 3rd place overall winners as well as age group winners.

Website: http://stleonturkeytrot.weebly.com/

Tell us: Where are you racing on turkey day?

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Race It: Cystic Fibrosis Climb Milwaukee

Many runners incorporate stair climbing into their training at some point. Perhaps a few sprints up the Lake Park staircase or maybe the stairs from the Oak Leaf Trail to Prospect. But how about racing up 47 floors with 94 flights of steps? Our quads hurt just thinking about it!

You can try it out next week at the 27th annual CF Climb Milwaukee stair climb race. Below, event coordinator, Julie Nilson, and MKE stair climber, Josh Jackett, tell us about this year’s event and why local runners should consider racing it!

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Can you start by giving us an overview of the race?

The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is proud to announce its 27th year of “going vertical” to defeat cystic fibrosis (CF). CF Climb Milwaukee will be held on Thursday, November 10 at the US Bank Building – the tallest building in Milwaukee! Once participants reach the top, they will have the opportunity to enjoy amazing panoramic views of downtown Milwaukee before heading down to our post-climb celebration, complete with food donated by Downtown Kitchen, drinks, entertainment and awards!

What makes this event unique?

We are the longest standing stair climb in the Milwaukee area – 2016 will mark our 27th annual! Stair climbs are unique, fun and provide a new opportunity to challenge yourself!

Who can participate in this race?

Anyone! Participants range from young to old, elite to getting-in-shape, police officers to firefighters (in full gear!). Relay teams are available for first timers who want to start slow.

Where is the race held? How does the event work? What are the different types of categories a racer can enter?

US Bank Building – Galleria Level

777 E Wisconsin Avenue

Milwaukee, WI 53202

The schedule of events for Thursday, November 10 is as follows:

5:30-6:15pm: Check In & Registration
6:20pm: Start for Fire/Police Individuals & Teams
6:30pm: Start for Corporate Teams
6:40pm: Start for Individuals
6:50pm: Start for Combined-Time Teams
7:00pm: Start for Relay Teams
6:45-9:00pm: Survivor Party!

The participant categories are as follows:

  • Individual (Racer or Walker) – Individual climbs 47 floors, timed
  • Fire/Police Individual – Individual climbs 47 floors wearing full gear*, timed
  • Relay Team – 3 individuals climb 1/3 of the way up tagging off in relay fashion, timed
  • Combined-Time Team – Unlimited number of individuals climb 47 floors each, timed. The top three times of each team are used to qualify for awards.
  • Fire/Police Team – Unlimited number of individuals climb 47 floors each wearing full gear*, timed. The top three times of each team are used to qualify for awards
  • Corporate Team – Up to 20 individuals climb 47 floors each, timed. The top three times of each team are used to qualify for awards.

Are there overall and/or age group prizes awarded?

Yes! Overall, age/ gender and team prizes are awarded.

What do participants get with their race entry?

A t-shirt, cinch bag and dinner/beverages during our post-climb reception – the survivor party!

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Tell us a bit about the nonprofit partner – how does the race benefit this organization?

The CF Foundation is the world’s leader in the search for a cure for cystic fibrosis, and nearly every CF-specific drug available today was made possible with our financial support. We are a donor-funded, 501(c)(3) nonprofit that is fully accredited by the Better Business Bureau’s (BBB) Wise Giving Alliance program.

The mission of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is to cure cystic fibrosis and to provide all people with the disease the opportunity to lead full, productive lives by funding research and drug development, promoting individualized treatment and ensuring access to high-quality, specialized care.

And now let’s hear from a local veteran stair climb racer, Josh Jackett!

How did you get into stair climb races?

Before I started stair climbing, I first started running in 2011 as a means of staying in shape. The next year, in 2012, I ran my first 5K and I loved it. Over the course of the rest of the year, I started running more and more races.

Late that same year, a longtime family friend suffered an aneurysm and a subsequent series of strokes. She bounced around a few hospitals and rehab centers before ultimately receiving tremendous treatment at the rehabilitation center that puts on the yearly SkyRise Chicago—a 103-story stair climb to the top of Willis (Sears) Tower. In January 2013, following her treatment, one of her daughters posted something on Facebook saying she and her other siblings were looking to form a team later on that year as a way to support that organization for how they’d helped her mom.

I figured I liked running in races, so why not try racing up a building? About a week after that Facebook post, I learned about a Milwaukee climb in March at the US Bank Center downtown. Since Willis Tower is more than double the height of the Milwaukee building, I decided it would probably be wise to try the local climb first to see if I’d actually even like scaling the entirety of a building’s stairs.

The second I crossed the finish line, I was hooked. For as much as I loved running in road races, crossing the finish line at the top of a building was the most rewarding race experience I’d encountered. It’s not too scenic in a stairwell, but the view from a skyscraper’s observation deck more than makes up for it. I’ve now done more than 20 climbs across the country.

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What are some of the bigger stair climb events held around the Milwaukee area? Are these types of races common around this area?

Stair climbs aren’t too common in general. There are only about 250 to 300 stair climbs per year throughout the entire US; however, if you’re into stair climbing, Milwaukee’s a good place to be. Not including stadium climbs, there are two local climbs each year, plus six not too far away in Chicago. There are also another dozen or so within about a 6-hour drive radius.

Like nearly all climbs throughout the country, both Milwaukee climbs are primarily charity fundraising events. Each March, the American Lung Association in Wisconsin holds its Fight For Air Climb, which offers participants a single climb (one time up) or a “power hour” (climb to the top as many times as you can in an hour). Then, each November the Wisconsin Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation puts on this particular climb, CF Climb Milwaukee, which offers only a single climb. Both events utilize the same building—the 47-story US Bank Center.

How is training for a stair climb event different from training for a running event?

Not everyone trains the same, and stair climbing does attract a cross-section of endurance athletes and fitness fanatics from varying disciplines—runners, cyclists, triathletes, CrossFitters—but I’ve met a decent number of runners who’ve transitioned well into stair climbing. Some of the best climbers I’ve met come from running backgrounds, in fact. Running is my main activity, too, so I train for stair climbing primarily through running. This isn’t the same for every runner who does climbs, but personally, I run four days per week—which includes a hard workout run and a long run—but I do supplement my run training with some higher-intensity workouts, including weightlifting, plyometrics, actual stairwell training, and Jacobs Ladder workouts. High intensity work is important, as it prepares your body and mind for a climb. I also treat stair races much the same as I treat running events by periodizing my training (base phase, intensity buildup, race taper).

Are there any running skills that transfer over to stair climb races?

A good cardio base, running economy and muscular endurance in your legs (particularly the quads) are the primary things that transfer over. Anyone can participate in a stair climb, but because those are things runners gain by running, they tend to have a head start over many others who try out a climb.

It also helps to know your body. Runners put themselves through a lot of physical stress, so they tend to know what their bodies can handle. The stair experience is different, but listening to what you’ve learned about your body through running can help your effort throughout a climb.

Also, pacing! I personally still have tons of work to do when it comes to this—even in my road races—but proper pacing up dozens of stories of stairs is vital to a solid climb.

What tips & strategies do you recommend for first-time stair climb racers?

Not everyone trying a climb out for the first time is going for a fast time. That’s probably a wiser approach to a first climb. But, basically, if you’re trying to finish the fastest you can, some things you can do include double-stepping, using the railings to help pull yourself up, not actually running up the stairs, not starting too fast, and not stopping until you reach the top.

Good, efficient stair climbing is more like a power hike than a run. Even though the race is shorter in duration than most runs of any distance, your body’s demand for oxygen is much higher pushing yourself upward than it is propelling yourself forward. You’re doing a lot of the former and a little of the latter in a stair climb. Running up the stairs, or even simply climbing too fast, especially early on in a race will cause you to burn out or blow up pretty quickly and really badly.

Do not be afraid to use the railings to save some energy in your legs. Your upper body may wear down a little, but you’ll have spared your legs, which will help you finish. It’s also of note that if you can land no more than one foot on each landing to pivot onto the next flight, it’ll help save time, too. Some people take it easy on the landings as mini-breaks and tend to lose time that way.

As for double-stepping, it does require more power, strength, and muscular endurance, but if you can do it the whole way up, you’re cutting the number of strides it takes to reach the top in half. To me, double-stepping in a stair race is the equivalent of running in a road race, where single-stepping a stair climb is like walking a road race. I’ve also heard it said that single-stepping a stair race “is like being stuck in first gear.”

Specifically for this event – what types of things should racers consider to help them plan their race?

First, get there early and get check-in out of the way. Make sure you do a warm-up. It’s important in running, but between the range of motion in play and the oxygen you’ll use, getting your muscles activated and your body warm will help a lot. Save some for the climb, though, of course.

Also, judging from my own personal race results, as well as other runners I’ve encountered who’ve climbed the US Bank Center’s stairs, if you have a good balance of leg strength and endurance, and you execute well, your finishing time will optimally be around the per-mile pace you might typically do a 10K in. For instance, if you usually run a 55-minute 10K, you *should* be able to climb the US Bank Center in around 8:50-ish.

This doesn’t mean you will, especially your first time out—usually it takes some experience understanding the effort required in a stair race to reach that mark or better. Plus, some runners are more imbalanced toward endurance and less toward strength/power/muscular endurance, which might negatively affect them reaching that mark. It might be a good starting point to come up with a pacing strategy, though. Maybe figure out a target time around your 10K per-mile pace, possibly a tad slower to be safe, then break the race down into chunks, aiming to be at certain floors by certain times. Or, if you’re a “by effort” road racer, try that out here, too. Just don’t start too fast; it’ll feel easy until it doesn’t.

Is there any race etiquette or rules that people should keep in mind at a stair climb race?

Among those who climb regularly and/or competitively, the key pieces of etiquette center around climbing unimpeded (i.e., not having to pass anyone). Stairwells are only so wide, so races tend to release participants in waves—often based on how fast climbers are—and within those waves, climbers go one at a time, every few seconds.

No race is perfect at arranging start waves, but often within those waves, climbers sort of self-seed themselves at the start line in order of who thinks they’ll be the fastest down to who thinks they’ll be the slowest. “Fitness profiling” at the start line isn’t an exact science either, and it’s not always possible, so more important than that is letting faster climbers PASS ON THE INSIDE. Some climb events have it backwards and suggest that faster climbers pass on the outside, but even at those events I’d still recommend trying to pass on the inside.

Everyone should try to climb along the inside railing (the side where you turn). Some people who want a slow, leisurely climb might stay to the outside, which is fine. But at the US Bank Center, the inside is the right side, as every turn to the top is a right turn. Climbing on the inside is the most efficient way to climb, as, distance-wise, it’s the shortest path to the finish line. If someone faster than you is approaching you from behind, it takes far less energy for you to step out of the way for a second to let them pass than it is for them to step around you and try to pass. It creates extra distance for them to travel. In some situations, you might not be aware of someone approaching from behind. So, for ease of things, be alert and courteous. If you’re about to pass someone, let them know your intent; if you’re about to be passed, step aside and let them go.

Any other comments?

I can’t tell you how many fellow runners I’ve met who are wary/leery of trying a stair climb. It’s not necessarily easy, but I think more runners would enjoy it than they think. Also, if nothing else, stair climbing is a fantastic way to cross-train for running, especially for those hilly courses. I work with a running coach who likens it to an exaggerated form of hill running. It builds tremendous leg strength, it improves your running economy, and it helps your mental toughness. Plus, you can’t beat the view at the top.

Thanks so much for chatting with us, Julie and Josh! There’s still time to register for this year’s CF Climb Milwaukee. To learn more about the race or to register, visit the race website.

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Race It: Mustache Dache 5k

Get ready for one of the hairiest races to ever hit MKE – the Mustache Dache 5k is coming to our city on November 12! Everyone is welcome to take part in this race that will benefit Movember, the only global charity focused solely on men’s health.

Below, Race Director Chris Ponteri tells us a bit more about the upcoming event and why you should race it!

For race specifics, visit our Featured Races page.

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Can you start by giving us a quick overview of the Mustache Dache 5k?

It’s a 5k run/walk to benefit the Movember Foundation, which is a global charity focused on men’s health. It is open to everyone, not just men. Women and children are encouraged to participate.

What makes this race unique?

We try to create a fun atmosphere instead of it being a serious race.

Who can participate in this race? Do people have to sport a mustache to participate?

It’s really open to anyone; men and women, boys and girls, mustache or no mustache!

This race is being held at The Rock, a location not many local races are held at. What is the course like?

It’s an interesting course. Trying to fit in a 5k at The Rock was a challenge. It’s an amazing facility; beautiful views and full of character. The course itself will include a few out-and-backs on the road in front of The Rock, and then a fun trip through the baseball diamonds. There are some hills and turns so it won’t be a crazy fast course.

Are there any overall and/or age group prizes awarded?

There are age group awards to the top three males and females in five different categories.

What do participants get with their race entry?

A super-cool shirt, a finisher’s medal, a goody bag and post-race food and drinks.

What post-race activities are available?

The Rock has a sweet Umbrella Bar area with a large patio so we hope to have a fun atmosphere after the race. There will be food and beverages.

Thanks for chatting with us, Chris! To learn more about the Mustache Dache, or to register for the race, visit http://mustachedache.com/milwaukee/.

Have a fabulous weekend, everyone!

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Race It: Dunkel Dash 5k

Looking for something to do on Thursday evening? Consider racing the 2nd annual Dunkel Dash 5k!

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This timed race kicks off Milwaukee Oktoberfest with a course that runs around the city’s scenic lakefront.

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Here are the details you need to know:

When: Thursday, Oct. 13 @6pm

Where: Veteran’s Park, Milwaukee

Cost: $35 for adults; $20 for kids

All participants receive a long-sleeve race t-shirt, an official Milwaukee Oktoberfest glass beer stein, a post-race Sprecher beer or soda and a post-race brat from the Milwaukee Brat House. After the race, participants can stick around and enjoy music by the Austrian Express.

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Packet pickup will be held at Performance Running Outfitters in Shorewood on Wednesday, Oct. 12 from 5-7pm. Race-day packet pickup will be held in Veteran’s Park from 4-5:30pm.

To learn more about the race or to register, visit the race website.

 

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

 

Race It: Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon 5k

For those of you not already signed up for this year’s Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon, consider running the inaugural Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon 5k! Whether you want to test your speed in a shorter distance or want to get in a few miles while waiting for family and friends running the marathon to cross the finish line, this is a great race to add to your fall calendar.

What: Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon 5k

When: Sunday, October 2 @8:30am

Where: Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee

Cost:

Runners start in front of the Milwaukee Art Museum and follow a course that goes around Lakeshore Park before winding through Veterans Park for a loop around the lagoon before crossing the same finish line as the marathon runners.

Chip timing is available for the race and there is a 60-minute cutoff time. Awards will be given to the Top 3 Overall Male and Female winners as well as the Male and Female Overall Masters winners. Age group prizes will also be awarded.

Participants who register before September 21 are guaranteed a race t-shirt. All participants will enjoy snacks and free beer from MKE brewing after the race.

All proceeds will be donated to the Milwaukee Police Department Endurance Club for use in purchasing updated recreational equipment for the MPD.

To learn more and to register for the race, visit the Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon 5k website: https://www.zapevent.com/reg/event/11365

Will we see you on Oct. 2?

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Race It: Milwaukee Running Group OMG Beer Mile

Think you’ve got what it takes to run four laps and drink four beers in less than 30 minutes?

Milwaukee Running Group OMG – for those of you not in the know, OMG stands for Original Milwaukee Group – is hosting its third annual Beer Mile this Saturday. It’s an event you won’t want to miss. Whether you’re running or spectating, it’s sure to be a great time!

Below, OMG organizer Patrick Bieser, tells us more about this year’s event.

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When is this year’s Beer Mile and where will it be run?

The third annual Beer Mile OMG will be run on Saturday, August 20th starting at 5pm at the Rugby Field at the Lakefront. The event is free. We will be attempting to break the Group World Record for the Beer Mile established last year.

Who can participate and how can people register?

Anyone who can run four laps on a 400-meter track while drinking four beers can attend. In past years, a few Beer Mile pros completed the challenge in less than 7 minutes, but most people take 10-20 minutes. Registration, race details and a map to the rugby field can be found on the Milwaukee Running Group website – www.milwaukee-running-group.com.

How did the OMG Beer Mile get its start?

We first heard of the Beer Mile a few years ago from a member and knew immediately this would become our signature event. OMG has more than 600 members, and the Beer Mile is our only official race. With so many excellent local races hosted by Badgerland Striders, we didn’t see a need for more. But a race with beer as the main challenge? That was a clear and present community need, and a perfect fit for OMG.

We wanted our Beer Mile to be a group event and encourage those who have not yet developed a love for beer to participate. To accomplish this, we designed the race to be less about individual times and more about having fun and giving back. We encourage costumes and a charity donation. We allow relay teams. We throw in an after party and an outdoor movie for good measure. This will be our third year hosting the Group Beer Mile and participation has doubled each year.

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Can you explain how the event works? What rules do participants need to follow?

The official “Group Beer Mile” rules were established by OMG and were adapted from the rules for individuals posted at Beermile.com.

The Group Beer Mile consists of four beers over a 1-mile course. For smaller groups, this is done on a standard 400-meter track. One beer per lap, four laps. The records are set for the most people completing the Beer Mile in less than 30 minutes.

There is only one major rule changes for groups. The Group must raise money for a local charity with some sort of link to running.

  1. Each individual will drink four cans of beer and runs four laps on a track (Start – beer, lap, beer, lap, beer, lap, beer, lap – Finish).
  2. The group world records are established by 1) counting the number of group members who cross the finish line in under 30 minutes and 2) recording the amount of money raised for charity.
  3. Any group member can drop out at any time without penalty, but the “group” record is set based on the number of people who finish, including penalty laps.
  4. Relay teams of 2×2 and 4×1 are allowed. Times for relay teams are recorded separately.
  5. Beer must be consumed before the lap is begun.
  6. Competitors can drink canned or bottled beer and the cans/bottles should not be less than 355ml (the standard can volume) or 12oz (the imperial equivalent).
  7. No specialized cans or bottles may be used that give an advantage by allowing the beer to pour at a faster rate. i.e. “super mega mouth cans” or “wide mouth bottles” are prohibited.
  8. Beer cans must not be tampered with in any manner, i.e. no shotgunning or puncturing of the can except for opening the can by the tab at the top. The same applies with bottles – no straws or other aids are allowed in order to aid in the speed of pouring.
  9. Beer must be a minimum of 4.5% alcohol by volume (this allows for Pabst, the official OMG beer). No hard ciders and or lemonades.
  10. Each beer can must not be opened until the competitor enters the transition zone on each lap.
  11. Competitors who vomit before they finish the race must complete one penalty lap at the end of the race (immediately after the completion of their 4th lap). Note: Vomiting more than once during the race still requires only one penalty lap at the end.
  12. If attempting official records, runners should tip the empty beer can or bottle over their head at the end of a chug to verify an empty vessel.

Is this an event people can train for? And if so, what do you recommend?

Training is recommended if you’re serious about your race time. The hardest part is drinking fast and running with an overload of carbonation. One way to train is to try to finish a beer while watching a political ad on TV. The timing is right, and the alcohol blunts the messaging.

Can you tell us more about the world record aspect of the event? How many participants do you need this year to break the record?

Two years ago Milwaukee set the Group World Record for the Beer Mile at 26 people running, and last year we smashed it with 42 running. We are on track to break the record again this year. Beermile.com does not record or even mention Group World Records, but since Milwaukee is the beer capital of the world it is only proper and fitting that a local running group take up the mantle and establish the Group World Record.

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What have been the winning times for men and women? Any contenders for the win this year?

The men’s winning time last year was 6:46 set by James Burke. The women’s winning time was 9:48 set by Christina Lundberg. Local Beer Mile hero Tim Cigelske didn’t run last year, but he is signed up this year and could challenge the record. We hear that he’s been training.

Has anything crazy or unexpected happened during previous years?

Like spectators at auto races waiting for a crash, spectators at the Beer Mile wait for someone to vomit. Fingers point and bets are made and lots of loud burps can be heard, but thankfully vomiting only occurs about as often as Kanye and Taylor Swift go on a date.

Last year several people showed up in jeans and street shoes and decided to run. Several members of a bachelor party dropped by to spectate and decided to run. The energy at the event is infectious. Lots of people wearing costumes, fake mustaches, a stay puff marshmallow woman, wigs and team t-shirts.

Are spectators welcome?

Yes. It’s as much fun to watch as it is to run. Attendance is half runners and half spectators.

What are some of the other activities around the event?

After the run, our alcohol addled brains tell us it’s time to watch a classic movie. This year it’s the Blue Brothers! We took a poll and half the people asked (the millennial half) have never seen this important piece of American history. In the spirit of patriotism in this election year, we felt a movie about two men on a mission to save an orphanage, with some beer and music thrown in, was as American as we could get.

Thanks so much for chatting with us, Patrick! If you’re up for giving the Beer Mile a try this weekend, learn more and register at www.milwaukee-running-group.com.

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Race It: Lake Michigan Marathon

The fall race season is just a few weeks away. To kick things off, the Lake Michigan Marathon (and 50k, half marathon and 20-mile training run) provides a perfect opportunity to see where you’re at going into the season while taking in some of Milwaukee’s most picturesque sights along the way.

Below, Race Director Chris Ponteri tells us more about this year’s race, which takes place on Sunday, September 4.

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An urban trail marathon is super unique – how did you get the idea for the race and how did you select the location?

One day I was running on the Oak Leaf Trail behind Warnimont Park and saw all of these dirt trails connecting to the Oak Leaf so I decided to go exploring. When I saw the vast trail system that the folks at County Parks had built back there, the light bulb went off and I decided to start a race there.

Is there anything else that sets this race apart from others in the area?

I like to call it a “boutique race” in that we intentionally keep it small so we can give our runners a high level of attention. With the hot temperature last year, that became more of a challenge since we had to make special accommodations to ensure safety.

Is there anything new or different happening at this year’s race?

No, it’s mostly the same thing as last year. We are only in our third year so we haven’t needed to freshen things up yet.

What is the course like?

The course is mostly a combination of paved and dirt trails, but there is even some road, grass, wood chips, wooden bridges, stones and concrete steps. I would not call it very technical since most areas are wide and well-marked. How much is paved vs. unpaved depends on the distance you are running, but in general about two-thirds is paved.

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Where are the major hills on the course?

There are no major hills. The course is mostly flat. The biggest hill is on the Oak Leaf Trail through Bay View Park, but it’s not much of an incline/decline.

What are the most scenic spots on the course? Any landmarks along the way that runners should watch for?

There are many locations with stunning views of Lake Michigan and downtown Milwaukee. This truly is Milwaukee’s “lakefront marathon” since the entire course is within a few hundred yards of the lake. The course goes through several of Milwaukee County’s most scenic parks including Grant, Warnimont, South Shore, Sheridan and Bay View.

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Tell us about the aid stations – what will be available and where are they located?

We have five aid stations and each will be used multiple times since the course is a combination of out-and-backs and loops. They will have water, Clif Shots and Sword, which is an up-and-coming and very effective sports drink. If it’s a warm day, we will have sponges and buckets of cold water.

Who were last year’s overall winners for the 50k, marathon and half marathon? Are any of them back to contend for the win again this year?

Last year we had a very strong field. Winners were Cory Harris and Kirsten Kolb in the Marathon, Mark Caballero and Eliza Weaver in the Half Marathon, and Michael Miller and Mary Flaws in the 50k. I am not sure if any will be back this year to defend their titles, but I hope so. I know Nick Seiske is signed up for the 50k and will be a strong favorite to win that race.

Any other comments?

We have had a nearly 40% increase in registrations so far this year. That is remarkable considering this has been another down year for most marathons and half marathons. We are excited about that!!

Thanks so much for chatting with us, Chris! There’s still time to sign up for this year’s Lake Michigan Marathon. To get in on the fun, register here: https://raceroster.com/events/2016/7926/lake-michigan-marathon

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Race For The Eats!

If you’ve still yet to experience a food-themed race, now’s your chance. MKE has two delicious races in the next two weeks. Whether you crave sweet or salty, these races have you covered!

Cream Puff 5k

When: Wednesday, July 20 @6:30pm

Where: Wisconsin State Fair Park

The Dish: Participants will receive the first Original Cream Puffs of the year as well as a post-race beverage of choice (beer, soda or water). There will also be pre-race entertainment by the Milwaukee Airwaves as well as post-race music from The Love Monkeys! In addition, participants will receive one ticket to this year’s Wisconsin State Fair, a Cream Puff 5k t-shirt and a finisher’s ribbon.

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The 5K course includes the famous Milwaukee Mile Speedway and streets within State Fair Park. The event is both kid- and stroller-friendly. There is also a 1K option for those who prefer a shorter route. Water will be available at multiple locations throughout the race.

Registration is $35 for adults up until race day, and $40 the day of the race.

Learn more at CreamPuff5k.com

Race for the Bacon

When: Thursday, July 28 @6:30pm

Where: Sheridan Park, Cudahy

The Dish: This race is all about bacon with a mid-race bacon station and post-race Bacon Bash, which includes plenty of delicious bacon treats and a free beverage from Sprecher. There will also be pre- and post-race music from Big Shoes! In addition, participants receive a race t-shirt and goody bag.

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The fast 5k course weaves around Sheridan Park and the surrounding area. There is also a 0k distance available for those who wish to participate in all the bacon festivities without running or walking a 5k!

Registration is $40 for the 5k until race day and $45 the day of the race. The 0k is $30 until July 28 and $35 the day of the race.

Learn more at BaconRace.com

Who’s hungry for a good race? Tell us if you’re racing the Cream Puff 5k or Race for the Bacon!

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

4th of July Weekend Local Race Roundup

According to Running USA, the 4th of July is the second most popular day for road racing. Below are a few local races to get in on the action over the holiday weekend!

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New Berlin National Dash

What: 5k Run/Walk; 2-mile Run/Walk

When: Saturday, July 2 @8am

Where: Malone Park, 16400 West Al Stigler Parkway

Cost: $25 for the 5k or 2-mile

Details: New course for this year’s race; Age group awards

2015 Overall Winners: Jeff Metler (15:28); Brittany Kozlowski (18:40)

http://www.newberlinjuniors.org/national-dash.html

Independence Day Run

What: 5k and 10k Run/Walk

When: Saturday, July 2 @8am

Where: Fox River Park, W264 S4500 River Road, Waukesha

Cost: $40

Details: Part of the Wisconsin Trail Assail Running Series; Overall and age group awards

Website: http://www.silvercirclesportsevents.com/independence-day-run-fox-river-park

Kenosha Firecracker Run

What: 5k and 10k Run/Walk

When: Sunday, July 3 @8:30am

Where: Kenosha Library Park  5947 7th Avenue, Kenosha

Cost: $30

Details: Overall and age group awards

2015 5k Overall Winners: Kevin Ryan (16:17); Amy Sichmeller (21:16)

2015 10k Overall Winners: Ryne Scopp (34:29); Leslie Ruffalo (39:49)

Website: http://kenoshaymca.org/special-events/firecracker-run/

Dennis Krzykowski 5k

What: 5k Run/Walk

When: Monday, July 4 @7:30am

Where: Cedar Creek Park, Portland Road, Cedarburg

Cost: $25

Details: Post-race awards and door prizes

2015 Overall Winners: Jack O’Neil (17:20); Taylor Miller (20:13)

Website: http://www.active.com/cedarburg-wi/running/distance-running-races/dk5k-dennis-krzykowski-5k-family-fun-run-2016?cmp=39-34-156210&ltcmp=254301&ltclickid=06_96533839_1e15eb98-6bc4-43c8-9ca4-1129a64d2c62&cmp=39-34

Badgerland Striders Firecracker Four

What: 4-mile Run/Walk + 1.7-mile Community Fun Run

When: Monday, July 4 @8am

Where: Hales Corners Park, 5675 South New Berlin Road

Cost: $25 for the 4-mile Run/Walk; $20 for the 1.7-mile Fun Run

Details: Overall and age group awards

2015 Overall Winners: Bill Prom (20:40); Priscilla Schultz (23:52)

Website: http://www.badgerlandstriders.org/home/Races/FirecrackerFour.htm

River City 4th Fest 5k

What: 5k Run/Walk

When: Monday, July 4 @8am

Where: Whitford Park, 625 N River Road, Waterford

Cost: $25

Details: Overall, masters and age group awards

2015 Overall Winners: Ryan Hopper (16:31); Jessica Monson (17:05)

Website: http://chamber.waterford-wi.org/events/details/river-city-4th-fest-5k-run-07-04-2016-670

Share time! Where are you racing this weekend?

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

Race It: Run Like A Mother 5k + A Race Entry Giveaway!

In honor of moms everywhere, Run Like A Mother is a 5k that’s all about making moms feel special. Below, Race Director Chris Ponteri tells us a bit about this year’s race and why you should consider joining in the fun, whether you are a mom yourself, are running with your mom or are racing in honor of your mom!

For race specifics, see our Featured Races page.

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Can you start off by telling us a bit about Run Like A Mother? How many years has the race been run in Milwaukee?

It is a 5k run/walk with mothers in mind. Since it’s held on Mother’s Day, we like to pamper mothers (and all finishers) and make them feel special. This is the 5th year. The first two years were held at Hoyt Park in Wauwatosa, then it moved to Veterans Park at the lakefront, and now the race will be back at Hoyt Park. I feel like the Tosa location is much better for an event like this. It just seems like the right home for us.

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What makes this race different/unique? Is it true only women can run the race?

It’s open to everyone, but we usually see about 99% of the participants being females. All finishers get a flower and a medal, which is something you typically don’t see in a 5k race. And the shirts are very high quality.

Tell us a bit about the race location and course – and do you have any course tips for runners hoping to run a fast time at the race?

The race starts in Hoyt Park and heads to the Oak Leaf Trail where there is an out-and-back, and then it finishes where it started. I would consider it a fast course since there aren’t too many turns and it’s fairly flat.

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What about the training plans offered on the race website – what types of plans are offered and who might they benefit?

Our running store partner – Performance Running Outfitters – is offering a training program to get beginners ready for their first 5k. You can find more information about this on our website or by contacting the Brookfield location.

Are there overall and/or age group prizes?

We will give awards to the top three overall finishers and have plenty of age group prizes.

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What do participants get with their race entry?

Everyone gets a nice bag and a very high quality shirt. Finishers get a medal and a flower.

Can you tell us a bit about this year’s nonprofit partner?

Our partner is the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation again this year. They do great work and are very supportive of local running events. We are happy to have them back.

Thanks for chatting with us, Chris!

Run Like A Mother is generously providing a race entry for one Keep Running MKE reader. To enter to win, answer the following question in the comments section:

What’s one thing you learned from Mom?

Best of luck to all who enter! We’ll announce the winner on Wednesday, March 30.

Keep Running MKE – you’re doing great!

 

*Winner will have 48 hours to claim their prize by emailing keeprunningmke@gmail.com. If the prize is not claimed within that time frame, we will select a new winner.